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Work Defending the Future: Sustainability Careers Post-Trump 

How to Get a Purpose-Driven Job in Business, NGOs, or Government

Webinar: Thursday December 1st, 7 PM

Dr. Eban Goodstein, Director of Graduate Programs in Sustainability at Bard College, will outline career strategies for both soon-to-be and recent college graduates, and for professionals looking to make a move. Goodstein will provide participants with a concrete job-search strategy, discuss what Trump’s election means for careers in social and environmental sustainability, and also field questions.

Log-in:  bluejeans.com/644334550

Dial-on Only: 1.888.240.2560  Code: 644334550

A version of the webinar for undergraduates can be viewed here.

The Jarchow Lab at the University of South Dakota is seeking an innovative and hard-working student to be part of the first cohort of students in a graduate program in sustainability that is being developed at USD.  The PhD position is fully funded for four years at ~$22,000 per year.  The position has a flexible start date of either summer or fall 2017.

The PhD position is part of a project, funded by NSF, titled “Sustainable socio-economic, ecological, and technological scenarios for achieving global climate stabilization through negative CO2 emission policies.”  The project brings together an interdisciplinary team of researchers from USD, Montana State University, and the University of Wyoming to evaluate the role that a BEECS (bioenergy and carbon capture and sequestration) economy would have on the Upper Missouri River Basin (UMRB).  The Jarchow Lab-led project has two main components.  First, we will assess, map, and quantify how residents of the UMRB perceive the social values of the ecosystem services provided by their environment.  Second, we will do sustainability visioning to develop a scenario of a desirable future for the UMRB.

Applicants with training in a number of academic disciplines will be considered for this position including sustainability, biology/ecology, environmental science or studies, political science, sociology, or other related fields.  Additional qualifications include knowledge of geographical information systems (GIS) software, excellent oral communication skills, and interest in conducting interdisciplinary research.

To apply for this position, please send a cover letter describing your career goals and how your experience and qualifications make you a strong fit for this position to me (Meghann.Jarchow@usd.edu).  Also attach your CV or resume, unofficial transcript(s), GRE scores (unofficial OK), TOEFL scores (for non-native English speakers only), and the names and e-mail addresses of three references.  Applicants are encouraged to submit their materials by 16 December 2016.

For more information, please contact me.

Meghann Jarchow

Assistant Professor

Sustainability Program Coordinator

Department of Biology

University of South Dakota

Churchill-Haines Labs 171E

(605)677-3115 (office)

(605)659-1889 (cell)

http://www.jarchowlab.org/

EcoCareer Conference

National Wildlife Federation’s EcoLeaders.

EcoCareer Conference 2017: Building Pathways to Sustainable Careers

Wednesday, February 22nd – Conference Day from 10 – 5:30 PM ET

Thursday, February 23rd – Workshop Day from 12 – 3 PM ET

http://online.nwf.org/site/Calendar?id=108403&view=Detail

 

As we all process and come to terms with the results of the election, the work continues and we keep on keeping on.

National Community College Sustainability Webinar

Community Colleges and the National Council for Science and the Environment

November 15th, 1:30 PM Central Time

This webinar will feature connections between the NCSE and community colleges through the NCSE’s Community College Alliance for Sustainability Education (CCASE).  Our presenters will be:

Michelle Wyman, Executive Director of the NCSE.

Wyman will discuss the growing role for community colleges at NCSE as well as the upcoming NCSE conference focusing on Environmental Health.

James Miller (Coordinator, Project Admin & Research); Kirk Sawyer (Professor, EMERGE) from Seminole State College of Florida.

The EMERGE program provides foundational, project-based learning opportunities to first- and second-year college students via a multifaceted certificate curriculum in sustainability and renewable energy that’s designed both to complement technical education degrees and to enrich liberal arts studies.  Focuses include hands-on laboratories that create certification pathways for future technicians as well as co-curricular projects that enhance engagement among non-technical students and make for a better informed, globally conscious citizenry.  Seminole State is a CCASE member and will also discuss their relationship with NCSE.

We may also have some time to discuss the impact of the election on our work.

When it’s time, join the meeting from here:
Join the meeting
 
When: Tuesday, November 15, 2016, 1:30 pm (1 hr), Central Standard Time (Chicago, GMT-06:00).
Access Information
 
Meeting Number:
991 827 124
 
Password:
(This meeting does not require a password.)
 
Audio Connection
 
913-469-2799 (JCCC Webex)

Access Code:
991 827 124

Deep breaths. Now let’s plan the fight ahead:

It’s hard to know what to say in a moment like this. Many of us are reeling from the news and shaken to the core about what a Trump Presidency will mean for the country, and the difficult work ahead for our movements.

Trump’s misogyny, racism, and climate denial pose a greater threat than we’ve ever faced, and the battleground on which we’ll fight for justice of all kinds will be that much rougher.

America, and the world we touch, has crossed overnight from an era of economic and political stability into a highly uncertain future. It is clear that much of the policy direction in support of sustainability that Washington has provided the past eight years will be reversed.  This means that for the next few years, our proactive work will now be happening within state and local government, corporations, start-ups, NGO’s, educational institutions, and faith organizations— as it did from 2000-2008.

Our work will not go away. In just the last three years, the planet has heated up almost a quarter of a degree. Meeting the needs of billions of more people all aspiring to a better quality of life demands that we still rewire the world with clean energy, still reinvent the global food system, still rebuild smart and inclusive cities, and fundamentally, put sustainability and sufficiency at the heart of what we are doing on the planet. This is a moment that calls on all of us to redouble our efforts to lead the change.

Please join us next Wednesday, 11/16  at noon eastern for an on-line conversation with Bill McKibben: 

 The Post Election Climate for Climate Action

Bill Mckibben, 350.org

Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Location: Webinar: bluejeans.com/163092697

Wishing you all the chance to get outside today, take a walk, and take in the world.

Library system lets you check out bicycles using your library card

Reblogged on WordPress.com

Source: Save the strawberries!

Don’t waste food. Freeze it.

Be more sustainable on picnics. Make your own utensils you can eat.

(From the Treehugger newsletter.)

Self-driving cars

The problem with this is where do bicycles fit in?

World Water Day is marked on 22 March every year. It’s a day to celebrate water. It’s a day to make a difference for the members of the global population who suffer from water related issues. It’s a day to prepare for how we manage water in the future. In 1993, the United Nations General Assembly designated 22 March as the first World Water Day. 23 years later, World Water Day is celebrated around the world every year, shining the spotlight on a different issue

2016 theme is:

Better Water, Better Jobs

By the United Nations

The Earth is not a trash can! Please don’t treat it like one.

waste not want not

Dear person driving the green sedan in front of me on the highway,

Tonight I was on my way to a sustainability event sponsored by the environmental non-profit associate board I serve on. I was driving along, listening to the radio, and minding my own business.

We were driving in the middle lane of the highway when your next action really stuck with me. You didn’t brake suddenly, or swerve into another lane endangering other drivers.

Instead, you rolled down your window and tossed some wrappers out onto the road, as if it were your own personal trash can. My jaw legitimately dropped and hung open for a good five minutes as a million questions ran through my mind.

How could you do that?

Why couldn’t you have just waited to where you were going to throw out those wrappers?

Who taught you that it was okay to litter?

What gives…

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Here are some great tips for green Spring cleaning from Treehugger.

waste not want not

Spring is finally here! And if you haven’t started purging half your belongings like me, you can still do your spring cleaning responsibly. I will be using these methods to clean my new apartment when I move in next week. Ah! So soon!

http://www.treehugger.com/cleaning-organizing/7-tips-green-spring-cleaning-without-toxic-chemicals.html

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This sounds like the new way all businesses and products should be.

waste not want not

Over the summer I had the opportunity to work with a start up called Oddisay as an expert sustainability consultant. Oddisay just officially launched as a sustainable goods marketplace. It is like Etsy, but with an eco-friendly  focus.

For instance, when you open a shop on Etsy (which I have done before), there is no vetting on the materials your product is made of. You could say it is made of local, organic, biodegradable hemp all you want, but you never have to actually prove anything.

On Oddisay, every product that is posted gets evaluated by 3 key qualities:

  1. What it is made of
  2. How it is designed
  3. How it is disposed

What It Is Made Of

Products on Oddisay must be made of sustainable materials that can be recycled, reused or reclaimed. Additionally, Oddisay strives to make sure that products are fairly sourced. It was described to my colleagues and I that…

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Here is a very sustainable cosmetics company.

waste not want not

I legitimately had no idea shampoo came in bar form.

After reading an article about LUSH Handmade Cosmetics and how they are striving for reduced packaging (I unfortunately cannot find the article I originally read), I decided to finally step into LUSH. To be honest, all this time I had avoided Lush because I found the the smell of the store so over-powering. All I thought was, “I do not want to smell like that LUSH store.”

But I went in, and I asked about their lack of packaging and for some suggestions about curly/wavy hair. I left with these purchases:

Honey I Washed My Hair Shampoo Barshampoo bar

I don’t think I had ever been so excited to wash my hair when I got home (and I hate washing my hair). First of all, it smells AMAZING. Like I could stand there all day and smell it.

In the shower, it works…

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Some great ideas to go paperless when cleaning.

This is a great way to up-cycle your clothing and accessories.

waste not want not

I did a lot of purging today, and man I was ruthless. I went through some of my closet, dresser, and drawers. Most of the time as I was going through my things, these thoughts popped into my head:

  • Wait, I still have this?
  • OMG, how old is this lotion/chapstick/nail polish/ etc.?
  • Did I wear this in high school?
  • I would not be caught dead wearing this
  • How many purses does one need?
  • I barely wear jeans, do I need 6 pairs?
  • Someone else will appreciate this more than me
  • When was the last time I did gymnastics, 6th grade?
  • I’m pretty sure the elastic in this has disintegrated

purge pile1 The beginning of what I dubbed, “The Purge Pile”

purge pile2 “The Purge Pile” begins to grow

purge pile4 “The Purge Pile” starts to take over my doorway.

purge pile3 All of the boxes in my closet that are headed to the recycling bin

My plan is…

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This is a great idea.

waste not want not

I shop for groceries twice a week. I use about five produce bags on each trip. That’s 10 bags a week, 40 bags a month, 480 bags per year. Whether or not I recycle or compost the bags (if…

Source: N.O.W. idea #5: Switch to Cloth Produce Bags

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Check out this blog review of People Towels and how they can replace paper towels.  Pretty cool idea.

paper towel alternative

This first ever summit for the southeast region of the U. S. will be in Chattanooga, TN April 20-21.

“This first-of-its-kind conference in the Southeast will bring together transportation and tourism officials from states across the region, as well as local stakeholders from the Greater Chattanooga area. The goal of the Summit is to share best practices for developing, designating, and promoting bicycle route networks and to begin articulating a broader vision for the role of bicycle tourism in the Southeast.”

The Tennessee Bicycle Summit will be April 22-23 also in Chattanooga.

Traveling by Bicycle

Bicycle travel is fun and sustainable.

Try commuting short distances first.  Maybe just 1 or 2 miles, then add a few miles each time you ride.  You might just discover that sometimes riding a bicycle is more efficient than driving a car and can also be more fun.

Some suggestions for starting to bike commute:

  • To work. — If it is too far, try driving part way or combining it with mass transit.
  • To school.
  • To the grocery store.
  • To a coffee shop.
  • For a lunchtime biking picnic adventure.
  • After work, park the car and go dinner by bike.
  • Bicycling is a great way to learn your community and meet people.

3 events in Nashville, TN to connect active transportation to transit stops. From Walk/Bike Nashville.

We are so excited to announce that we are partnering with Transit Center (from NYC) and Transit Now Nashville to present a special forum on March 3: Bridging the Gaps– Connecting Active Transportation to Transit.

Our city won’t be a great city to walk or bike in without a great transit system; and that transit system won’t function without great bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure. We have 4 really exciting presenters to share what is being done in Nashville, and around the world, to tackle this important issue.

  • Jon Orcutt: Transit Center Director of Communications and Advocacy (and former Policy Director for the New York City Department of Transportation)
  • Felix Castrodad: Nashville MTA Director of Planning
  • Erin Hafkenschiel: Nashville Mayor’s Office of Transportation and Sustainability
  • Adams Carroll: Nashville Planning Department Active Mobility Planner

 

Bridging the Gaps: Connecting Active Transportation to Transit
March 03rd, 2016 5:30 PM
RSVP

 

 

Franklin Pike Multimodal Study

This Saturday is the Franklin Pike Multimodal Study Open House. There are lot of changes on the horizon for this corridor, we’d love for you to attend this community meeting to share your opinions as to how to make the corridor more walkable and bikeable. Plus attendees have a chance to WIN A BIKE!

When: February 27

Time: 9am-Noon, Policy Walk at 10am

  • Walk the Corridor at 10am with Councilman Colby Sledge, Kimley Horn staff, Walk Bike Nashville, Public Works and Planning.

Where: Melrose Community Room, 2600 Franklin Pike

Who: YOU!

 

 

Stop Take Notice: Saturday Scramble

Hume Fogg Academic’s pedestrian advocacy group, Stop Take Notice, is organizing an event on March 12 to raise awareness of the Pedestrian Scrambles (also known as Barnes Dance or Diagonal Crossing) on lower Broadway.

They need volunteers and participants to help with the event! Please help out! This is a great way to get involved with a dedicated group of high-schoolers working for safer streets.

When: March 12 8-9am and then 11:30-1pm

Where: Meet at Hume Fogg Academic High School

What: Help paint chalk foot prints and then talk to public about proper use of pedestrian scramble.

If you value greenways, trails, bike lanes or sidewalks and support their role in improving the quality of life for all Tennesseans, please take a moment to sign our petition and contact your legislators.

In praise of slow cycling

This is all about how to encourage more everyday people to ride bicycles as transportation and leave the car at home.

 

 

This is all about being sustainable and the importance of trees, and listening to the “Lorax” inside of all of us.

Litterati

Cleaning up our planet one piece of trash at a time.

Trash is everywhere. Soda cans, plastic bags, and cigarette butts litter the environment, choke wildlife, and threaten our planet. By combining technology, social awareness and art, the Litterati is tackling this ever-escalating problem one piece of litter at a time.

Let’s see how many photos we can take using Instagram at Nashville State Community College, including cigarette butts. After taking the picture and posting it, don’t forget to either recycle it or put it in a landfill trash can.

Post to Litterati on Instagram using #litterati.

 

Bike4ROW

August 18th at 2 PM Central Time
Student Internships and Utilizing RFPs as Ways to Involve Students in On-Campus Projects

Colleen Butterfield, Project Manager, Education, Alliance to Save Energy
The Alliance to Save Energy’s PowerSave Campus program is a student-led initiative that promotes green careers, generates actual energy savings, increases awareness of the importance of energy efficiency, and encourages academic infusion of sustainability concepts. At this webinar, representatives from the program – which includes 16 campus and counting – will be presenting best practice case studies to help kickstart energy efficiency projects started on your campus. This particular presentation will focus on community colleges, but the projects are also field tested at four year universities. The webinar will also feature a round robin for questions as well as advice from those at community colleges about how to overcome unique challenges and barriers to initiating energy efficiency and/or student internships on campus.

Carson Bennett , Campus as a Living Lab Faculty Liaison, and Luis Campos, Executive Director, Facilities, Central New Mexico Community College
In order to utilize the built environment as a “Living Lab” for students to learn about sustainability concepts, the Physical Plant Department at Central New Mexico Community College includes an educational requirement in its RFP (Request for Proposals) process. Any vendor who wins a contract with the Physical Plant must be willing to provide educational opportunities to students at the college. These agreements have resulted in photovoltaic array installers visiting Math classes, construction companies displaying how they recycle demolished building materials, and our waste and recycling provider gathering data for use in Statistics, Psychology, and Technical Writing courses.

When it’s time, join the meeting from here:
https://meeting.jccc.edu/orion/meeting/meetingInfo?MeetingKey=993525335&siteurl=meeting&back=all

Password:
(This meeting does not require a password.)

Audio Connection

913-469-2799 (JCCC Webex)
No advance registration is required. For more information and additional access link, see:
http://www.jccc.edu/sustainability/events/webinars/index.html

Here are some examples of Trash Fashion shows used to promote recycling, upcycling, and sustainable living among college students.

http://green.uw.edu/promote/snapshots/trashion-show

http://www.indstate.edu/news/news.php?newsid=4157

http://wasteadvantagemag.com/wsra-recycled-fashion-show-holds-open-call-for-designers-and-models/

http://www.fiu-eco-couture.org/   It was a senior project by an architecture student.

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.658254967619383.1073741840.393013250810224&type=3          Part of Eco-Mania 2015 at Lehigh University by their Eco-Reps.

 

Learn how to use active transportation to get around Nashville.

http://walkbikenashville.org/walkbikeuniversity

 

I move because…

Read about why different Nashvillians move.

http://blog.walkbikenashville.org/

http://act.350.org/sign/reject-keystone-xl-now

http://www.bikearlington.com/pages/biking-in-arlington/winter-cycling/

Fall bike to work day in Nashville, TN is Thursday, Nov. 20. A group will leave the Richland Creek Greenway trail-head at 7:05.  Everyone is welcome to join in, and try commuting by bike. It’s a lot of fun, even in the cold.

This is an awesome invention for saving the planet. Would it be possible?

 

That was the question asked of 120 World Leaders at the U.N. Climate Summit on September 23 by the voices of your generation. Watch them in action and spread the word.

This is a film about how bicycle transportation transformed a neighborhood.

Watch this short video on “How to cycle in the city”. https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10152693683939809&set=vb.22898109808&type=2&theater#

The first annual Healthy and Sustainable Living MOOC will start on September 1, 2014 on WizIQ.
Course Highlights: Healthy Living, Sustainable Living, Mindfulness Meditation, Sustainability Treaties, Self-compassion, and Emotional Style.

title=”BiblioCycle” target=”_blank”>http://www.bpl.org/press/2014/07/08/mayor-walsh-launches-innovative-mobile-reading-initiatives-across-boston/

Collect cigarette butts and ship them to a company called TerraCycle and they will be made into many useful items.
Check out News Channel 5 for more information about this program and how you can help.

Buy these stickers to put on paper towel dispensers to encourage the use of hand blower driers. Some cool facts:
A single “These Come From Trees” sticker can save around a tree’s worth of paper, every year
More than 50,000 stickers distributed since 3/07
Laminated stickers hold up to washing.
A typical fast food restaurant with two bathrooms can use up to 2000 pounds of paper towels a year
The average coffee shop uses 1000 pounds of paper towels a year
A single tree produces around 100 pounds of paper
Roughly 50,000 fast food restaurants in the US
200,000 gas stations in the US
14,000 McDonald’s in the US
10,000 Starbucks in the US
An experiment in environmentalism, viral marketing, and user interface design
with the goal of reducing consumer waste paper!

How big is your ecological footprint.

Boxed water

A company the really cares about the environment:
http://www.boxedwaterisbetter.com/

Deadline is March 18.
http://neefusa.org/climatecontest

The Cumberland River Compact will be giving away 1,000 FREE large diameter seedlings on Valentine’s Day. Come by to pick up your tree(s) – first come, first serve!

Date/Time: Friday, February 14 from 11:00 AM – 1:30 PM

Location: River Center — Bridge Building — 2 Victory Ave. — Nashville 37213

The trees can be planted on public or private property. Planting address will need to be provided at pick up. Questions? Email us. (info@cumberlandrivercompact.org)

Remember that trees absorb storm-water, so they reduce the amount of urban runoff that reaches our neighborhood streams. Even a young tree can intercept hundreds of gallons of rain during a storm. Every tree makes a difference!

Winter bike commuting

Winter bike commuting

Feb. 14, 2014
An annual event celebrating bicycle commuting in winter. Encourage your friends to try. Fun stuff hosted locally. Any community can participate. Register or sign your community up: http://winterbiketoworkday.org/

https://www.facebook.com/WinterBikeToWorkDay

The 1 : 1 Movement

This organization started in San Diego, California, by a group of individuals who care about the future of planet Earth. They believe we can all be part of the solution.

http://1to1movement.org/

“We focus on raising awareness about sustainability, the issues surrounding sustainability, and how to continue the conversation on conservation. Our approach is from the bottom up, top down. Bottom up means grassroots educational programs that we lead in classrooms (K-12), colleges, and communities. Top down refers to our corporate outreach to work with business owners in how the market can be environmentally savvy for the wallet and community.” — website.

 

Great article on climate action.

The Ride for Reading organization was featured in Forbes magazine in December in a article about 12 days of charities worth supporting.

This organization was started by a 4th grade teacher here in Nashville, Tennessee.  He has a passion for literacy and riding bikes.  Check out the article.

A short film by Adam Neustadter.

 

My husband and I always get a live Christmas tree that we plant in our yard. We have only lost one tree in 36 years. It’s really fun to watch them grow. The first year we were married we got a live/cut tree and it was very dry about a week after we got it. My vote goes for real trees! The best way to water live trees that you plant is with ice cubes.

waste not want not

We have surpassed Thanksgiving. Now it is finally acceptable to enjoy anything Christmas.

Since K and I now live together we had the very adult discussion about artificial vs. real Christmas trees. K’s family has historically gone with real trees, while my family has pretty much always went the fake route.

From an environmental standpoint which is better?

christmas-tree Our Michigan grown Fraser Fir

Both have their own pros and cons.

Artificial Tree Pros

  • Don’t have to buy a new tree year after year, cheap
  • Convenience: can come pre-lit, no needles

Artificial Tree Cons

  • Will eventually be disposed of in a landfill
  • Not made from environmentally friendly or recyclable materials (such as PVC)
  • Most likely made in China (guessing here)

Real Tree Pros

  • Can be composted and mulched up
  • Local, grown in the USA
  • Bolsters local, small business economies
  • Smells awesome

Real Tree Cons

  • Water, land, and resources used on Christmas tree farms
  • Most…

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